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An Universal Dictionary of the Marine William Falconer

An Universal Dictionary of the Marine

William Falconer

Published September 12th 2013
ISBN : 9781230733326
Paperback
206 pages
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This historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1784 edition. Excerpt: ...object. PERIAGUA, a fortMoreThis historic book may have numerous typos and missing text. Purchasers can usually download a free scanned copy of the original book (without typos) from the publisher. Not indexed. Not illustrated. 1784 edition. Excerpt: ...object. PERIAGUA, a fort of large canoe, ufed in the Leeward iflands, South America, and the gulph of Mexico. It differs from the common vefiels of that name, as being compofed of the trunks of two trees, hollowed and united into one fabric- whereas thofe which are properly called canoes, are formed of the body of one tree. See Cakoe. PIER, a ftrong mound, or fence, projecting into the fea, to break off the violence of the waves from the entrance of a harbour. PILLAGE, (butin, Fr.) the plunder of a prize taken from an enemy. PILLOW, (coujfin, Fr.) a block of timber, whereon the inner-end of the bowfprit is fuppord. See Bowsprit. PILOT, the officer who fuperintends the navigation, either upon the fea-coaft or on the main ocean. It is, however, more particularly applied by our mariners to the perfon charged with the direction of a fhips courfe, on, or near the fea-coaft, and into the roads, bays, rivers, havens, &c. within his refpedtive diftrift. The regulations, with regard to pilots in the royal navy, are as follow: The commanders of the kings fiiips, in order to give all reafonable encouragement to fo ufeful a body of men as pilots, and to remove all their objections to his majeftys fei-vice, are ftriftly charged to treat them with good ufage, and an equal refpedl with warrant-officers. The purfer of the fhip is always to have a let of bedding provided on board for the pilots, and the captain is to order the boatfwain to fupply them with hammocs, and a convenient place to lie in, neartheir duty, and apart from the common men- which bedding and hammocs are to be returned when the pilots leave the fhip. A pilot, when conducting one of his majeftys (hips in pilot-water, (hall have the fole charge and command of the...